Press Photographer and Photojournalist

Commissioned Works

Mark Gilbert – Sky Sports magazine

I was recently given my first assignment by Sky Sports magazine NZ (sadly it was for their last issue) to produce a portrait of Mark Gilbert, the US Ambassador to New Zealand. When I first got the assignment I was a little apprehensive, knowing that it would be quite a pressured assignment. But simultaneously I was also quietly excited about the possibilities for a great portrait. The US Ambassador is an ex-White Sox baseball player and the crux of the story, at least as far as my part was concerned, was to tell the amalgamated tale of a sportsman-turned-ambassador.

I had two weeks to arrange a suitable time for the shoot and plan details for the portrait. It is very easy for your imagination to run wild with ideas for portraits (or photo ideas in general for that matter), and this assignment was no exception. The embassy’s press officer and I discussed possibilities of how to visually tell this story. Based on these conversations and further discussions I had with the journalist writing the article and the magazine’s editor and art director, I imagined myriad such scenarios including:

Mark standing, resting against a large, plush desk in his office at the embassy, while gently leaning forwards resting both hands on top of a baseball bat. A shelf lined with books in the background, and dappled, golden afternoon sunlight streaming through a window.

Or

At his home standing sideways-on to the camera, in front of a large mosaic of President Obama, a baseball bat resting on one shoulder, a catcher’s mitt resting in the other hand; cross-lit but with light shadows to create a subtle sense of drama.

Email conversations with the writer and the magazines editor and art director yielded more useful ideas for the theme of the shoot: Rolled-up sleeves CHECK. Casually leaning against desk CHECK. Pretending to take a swing at an invisible ball NO WAY (if you Google baseball portraits, this is probably one of the most common poses). Draping the American flag over one shoulder, or have it hanging in the back ground. CLICHÉ ALERT (or so I thought!).

To prepare for the assignment, I created a shot list of 4-5 variations of the shots I would like to use; from full-length shots to tight close-ups. I even tested the simple two-light set-up. When the day of the shoot arrived, I was nervous but prepared. All equipment was packed and ready. I’d taken the day off work so no time pressure there.

It took me ten minutes to have my equipment X-rayed at the security gate, handed over my iPhone (no phones or cameras allowed – at least they didn’t take this rule too seriously!). I then met the press officer and we entered the foyer of the main embassy building.

There we were confronted with an impenetrable wall of glass, with a US marine barely visible through all of that semi-transparent protection. Here I handed over my NZ drivers license (as a form of photo ID) in return for a clip-on ID badge. The marine, in all of his well-drilled-robot-like fashion, proceeded to instruct the press officer of the rules I MUST follow, all the while referring to me in the third person. I guess I was invisible through all of that toughened glass (must have been unable to see me due to internal reflection or something).

With a roll of her eyes, the press officer escorted me into their media briefing room where I was informed that this would be the sole location for the shoot. It was a featureless room of approximately four metres by four metres, stuffed with chairs, a lectern, tables, audio-visual equipment and other non-descript items for all your media briefing needs. Initially I was a bit panicked when I was told that this was it. More so when I was told that the Ambassador had an important guest arriving imminently and I would only have 20 minutes to do the portrait.

Luckily for me the media room had several backdrops (black/blue curtains were my background of choice), four LED panel lights and a spotlight mounted on rails attached to the ceiling, and most importantly, an AV tech that knew how to use them. They also had an American flag I could use as part of the background! All of this enabled me to mimic a studio-look to the portrait, and to hide the fact that we were in a featureless media briefing room.

With a handshake firm enough to cause a temporary disability in my trigger finger, the Ambassador greeted me, and we ‘shot the shit,’ as they say, and proceeded with the shoot. Mark had fun toying with me, pointing out the irony of an Englishman using imperial measurements to give directions……..can you just step back with your left foot a couple of inches……..

Explaining to the AV tech the look I was after and the lighting style I wanted to use (contrasty, cross/back-lighting on the subject, with a spotlight on the background) I managed to come away from this shoot with some reasonable portraits under the circumstances. Not quite what I had in mind originally, but the moral of this story is to always expect (and if you can plan for it) the unexpected!

Mark Gilbert US ambassador to New Zealand

Mark Gilbert US ambassador to New Zealand

Mark Gilbert US ambassador to New Zealand

Mark Gilbert US ambassador to New Zealand

Sky Sports Scan 1Sky Sports Scan 2Sky Sports Scan 3

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Unlimited magazine – Linc Gasking of 8i

I was commissioned by Unlimited magazine to create a portrait of CEO Linc Gasking of New Zealand tech start-up 8i, who develop virtual reality systems and 3D technology. The assignment came in on a Friday and the shoot was scheduled for first thing on Monday, giving me the weekend to organise props for the shoot. As we were not permitted to photograph any of the actual technology, to visualise the story we decided to shoot the portrait in Wellington’s Opera House to create the impression of somebody watching a 3D movie at the cinema.

I managed to collect 10 pairs of 3D glasses from a film junky friend, and managed to blag some empty popcorn cartons and drinks containers from the kind folks at Reading Cinema for the other props. I glued a cardboard baffle into the popcorn carton to give the impression that the cartons were full of popcorn.

I was aware that I would only have a total of twenty minutes to shoot the images for the story as Linc had to rush off to a meeting at 9am. As the Opera House is a darkly lit environment, I had already visualised how I would light the image, so when I arrived it was just a question of quickly setting up the key light, and have a second light back-lighting the subject and the Opera House seating.

Sadly this was my last shoot for Unlimited magazine as they have now been absorbed by Fairfax Media’s Stuff website, who use staff photographers rather than commissioning freelancers. Shame really as I love doing this work as it can be very fun and challenging.

Unlimited magazine - Linc Gasking - 8i Unlimited magazine - Linc Gasking - 8i Unlimited magazine - Linc Gasking - 8i Unlimited_Mag_Linc_Gasking_8i_feature_Page_1 Unlimited_Mag_Linc_Gasking_8i_feature_Page_4


Unlimited magazine – Glenn Milnes, Ike GPS

Several months ago I was commissioned to photograph Glenn Milnes of New Zealand software company Ike GPS. The company creates software that allows the accurate measurement of geographic features within a photograph taken from any smart phone. As the company had recently launched onto the New Zealand stock exchange, the angle for the story was floatation.

The magazine’s art director had arrange for the shoot to go ahead at Wellington Regional Aquatic Centre in Kilbirnie, and luckily for me, Glenn was pretty flexible time-wise meaning I could schedule this shoot in the evening after work. Below are some of the images from the shoot:

Glenn Milnes of Ike GPS for Unlimited magazineGlenn Milnes of Ike GPS for Unlimited magazineGlenn Milnes of Ike GPS for Unlimited magazine Glenn Milnes of Ike GPS for Unlimited magazine Glenn Milnes of Ike GPS for Unlimited magazine Glenn Milnes of Ike GPS for Unlimited magazineUnlimited Cover - Glenn Milnes Unlimited - Glenn Milnes feature_Page_3 Unlimited - Glenn Milnes feature_Page_2


Unlimited magazine – Richard Francis, Spotlight Reporting

It’s been a while since I posted any of my recent freelance work, so it’s about time I caught up. Spotlight Reporting is a company specialising in software analytics for business, based in Petone, Wellington. I was commissioned by Unlimited to photograph CEO Richard Francis. These assignments can be tough when it comes to creating successful portraits as often there is very limited time with the sitter (as generally they are busy, working people) and generally there is little opportunity to plan ahead with the photographs you intend to make, and you never know what the location looks like before you walk into it. Thinking on your feet and using any available elements to enhance the portrait are the order of the day.

Luckily for me on  this day, the afternoon sun was shinning brightly and when I arrived I noticed that the sun was shining through a slat-wood fence and would be perfect for creating a star-burst which would help illustrate the story of a company called Spotlight Reporting.

Richard Francis - Unlimited Magazine Richard Francis - Unlimited Magazine Richard Francis - Unlimited MagazineRichard Francis - Unlimited Magazine Richard Francis - Unlimited Magazine


12 Hours with New Zealand Police

At Christmas I was given an exciting reportage/photojournalism assignment in New Zealand by a Swedish trade magazine, Polisförbundet, the Swedish Police Union magazine. Working with Swedish journalist Ossian Grahn, I was commissioned to photograph a story on the use of non-lethal weapons (tasers) by New Zealand Police. Ossian was in Wellington for one week interviewing members of the New Zealand Police and the New Zealand Police Association, as well as organising permission for us to go on a ride-a-long.

We arrived at Wellington police station at 4pm on Saturday afternoon. We met the two officers who we would be shadowing for the next 12 hours, and followed them into the station carpark to get into the police car. At that moment, a high-ranking cop materialised and brashly told us we were not allowed to take pictures while out on the ride-a-long.  Arrangements for the ride-a-long had been negotiated between both the Swedish and New Zealand Police Associations and New Zealand Police in the months prior to our visit and getting pictures to illustrate the story was the main purpose of the assignment (for me anyway!).

So for the first three hours, I followed the police around on their duties while surreptitiously trying to snap images from the hip using the camera’s silent shutter function. All the while Ossian was frantically calling his contacts at the Police Association to find out what the misunderstanding was and to try to get permission to photograph as was previously arranged. Three hours later the confusion was over with, and I could take the memory card out of my sock and openly take pictures to my heart’s content. Luckily for us, the more interesting events occurred after the photo ban was lifted.

It was an eye-opening experience traveling around with the police and getting to experience how they operate and view the city. It gave me view of Wellington’s seedy underbelly that I hadn’t seen before!

Having the opportunity to create this reportage and meeting and working with Ossian was also a great experience. Hopefully we will be able to work together on another assignment if the opportunity presents itself.

A portrait of New Zealand police constables Richard Briscoe (left) and Anthony Davidson (right), who Ossian and myself shadowed for their 12 hour shift.

A portrait of New Zealand police constables Richard Briscoe (left) and Anthony Davidson (right), who Ossian and myself shadowed for their 12 hour shift.

Marque of Excellence: A New Zealand Police vehicle.

Marque of Excellence: A New Zealand Police vehicle.

Constable Richard Briscoe places the suspect white powder into an evidence bag.

Constable Richard Briscoe places suspect white powder into an evidence bag. The powder was found on the floor of a furniture workshop.

Richard Briscoe on Blair Street in Wellington for disorderly behaviour. The man was caught urinating in the entrance of a retail store after drinking too much alcohol.

Constable Richard Briscoe arrests a young man on Blair Street in Wellington for disorderly behaviour. The man was allegedly caught urinating in the entrance of a retail store after consuming too much alcohol.

Constable Richard Briscoe completes paperwork in the holding cells of Wellington Central police station after arresting a young man for disorderly behaviour for urinating in the entrance of a retail store.

Constable Richard Briscoe completes paperwork in the holding cells of Wellington Central police station after arresting a young man for disorderly behaviour for urinating in the entrance of a retail store. Patience is a necessity of the job for Police when dealing with intoxicated people.

A police car parked at the entrance to the holding cells in Wellington Central police station.

A police car parked at the entrance to the holding cells in Wellington Central police station.

Constables Richard Briscoe (left) and Anthony Davidson complete paperwork at Wellington Central police station.

Constables Richard Briscoe (left) and Anthony Davidson complete paperwork at Wellington Central police station.

A man who is known to police as a persistent offender and is in breach of his bail conditions is spotted on Wellington's Manners Street by police CCTV operators and is subsequently arrested.

A man who is known to police as a persistent offender and is in alleged breach of his bail conditions is spotted on Wellington’s Manners Street by police CCTV operators and is subsequently arrested.

Reportage: on the streets with Wellington Police. Reportage: on the streets with Wellington Police. Reportage: on the streets with Wellington Police.

Police constables Richard Briscoe (right) and Anthony Davidson (left) investigate a report of a domestic disturbance in a block of flats in Berhampore, a Wellington suburb.

Police constables Richard Briscoe (right) and Anthony Davidson (left) investigate a report of a domestic disturbance in a block of flats in Berhampore, a Wellington suburb.

Constables Richard Briscoe (far right) and Anthony Davidson (front right) chat with a couple who have  a record of historic domestic violence.

Constables Richard Briscoe (far right) and Anthony Davidson (front right) talk with a young couple who are known to have a record of historic domestic violence.

The Taser X26: Non-lethal weapons are routinely carried by New Zealand police to reports of domestic disturbances.

The young couple are interviewed separately by Richard and Anthony. It was fantastic to see the negotiating and mediating skills the police have when dealing with delicate and sensitive situations, and in this case, it was handled exceptionally well.

The Taser X26: Non-lethal weapons are routinely carried by New Zealand police to reports of domestic disturbances.

The Taser X26: Non-lethal weapons are routinely carried by New Zealand police to reports of domestic disturbances.

Anthony Davidson performs a routine traffic stop on a vehicle  with defective rear lights.

Constable Anthony Davidson performs a routine traffic stop on a vehicle with defective rear lights. Ossian is just visible in the back of the car, writing on his iPad.

Anthony Davidson sits inside the police car during a routine traffic stop.

Constable Anthony Davidson sits inside the police car during a routine traffic stop and is illuminated by the vehicles interior light.

Richard Briscoe performs a routine traffic stop on a vehicle  with defective rear lights.

Constable Richard Briscoe performs a routine traffic stop on a vehicle with defective rear lights.

Patrolling the streets of Wellington's entertainment district on Courtenay Place.

Patrolling the streets of Wellington’s entertainment district on Courtenay Place. An air of intoxicated animosity followed Richard and Anthony as they patrolled Wellington’s entertainment district in the early hours of the morning.

Patrolling the streets of Wellington's entertainment district on Courtenay Place.

Patrolling the streets of Wellington’s entertainment district on Courtenay Place.

Richard Briscoe talks to a woman regarding a domestic disturbance outside Wellington City Library. It is alledged that the woman attempted to stab her partner in the neck with a plastic fork.

Constable Richard Briscoe talks to a woman regarding a domestic disturbance outside Wellington City Library during the final minutes of his shift at 2am. It is alleged that the woman attempted to stab her partner in the neck with a plastic fork.

Reportage: on the streets with Wellington Police.

The woman begins to have a seizure and constables Richard Briscoe and Anthony Davidson place the woman into the recovery position while waiting for paramedics to arrive.

Reportage: on the streets with Wellington Police.

A mixture of alcohol and anti-depressant medication are believed to have caused the woman to have a seizure.

Paramedics attend to the woman who is believed to be having a seizure as a side effect of mixing anti-depressant medication with alcohol.

Below are the tearsheets for the printed article:

 

Swedish Police Union Magazine-1Swedish Police Union Magazine-2Swedish Police Union Magazine-3Swedish Police Union Magazine-4


James Bond

When I’m not masquerading as a photographer, I work full-time for a government department. On the odd occasion, my photographic services a called upon. The shot below was a quick 20 minute job in the basement car park, using some simple cross lighting techniques to give the seedy, noir look. We were aiming for a James Bond/secret agent theme group portrait (not entirely sure why to be honest, maybe just for fun) but the point of the photo is to be used in an internal campaign to help the organisation achieve the goal of becoming one of New Zealand’s top ten places to work.

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Unlimited Magazine – Campbell Gower

A couple of months ago I was commissioned by Unlimited Magazine to produce a portrait of Phil and Ted’s CEO, Campbell Gower. This was for the style of portrait known as The Office, and is predominantly more about environment than the person. Phil and Ted’s is an innovative designer of pushchairs and strollers. As you can see from the images below, this creative flair is fully incorporated into the fun and lively workspace. The assignment took about 1.5 hours, including the 40 minutes of manic driving to and from my work to the offices of Phil and Ted’s in the Wellington suburb of Newtown, during my lunch hour(s).

Portrait of Campbell Gower of Phil and Ted's.

Campbell sits in one of the workplace's more inviting and relaxing environments which is design to help the creative juices flow.

Campbell sits in one of the workplace’s more inviting and relaxing environments which is design to help the creative juices flow.

Campbell demonstrates a slide which employees use for express travel to the kitchen when rabid hunger or the need for the black bean strikes!

Campbell demonstrates a slide which employees use for express travel to the kitchen when rabid hunger or the need for the black bean strikes!

Pop art at Phil and Ted's.

Pop art at Phil and Ted’s.

Inspiring wall art at the offices of Phil and Ted's.

Inspiring wall art at the offices of Phil and Ted’s.

Phil and Ted's employees have a meeting in the fuselage of an old aircraft.

Phil and Ted’s employees have a meeting in the fuselage of an old aircraft.

Tearsheet for the main image used in the magazine article.

Tearsheet for the main image used in the magazine article.


Photographic Exploits and Exploitations: The Mysteriously Delayed Payment………

Freelancing as a photographer can be a competitive business, even more so in a small city like Wellington where the photography market is small, and where several local education institutions churn out photography graduates by the bus-load every year. In Wellington, everyone knows somebody who is a photographer. The recent changes in digital photography and multimedia platforms, combined with the massive quantity of digital imagery available, have cheapened the craft of photography in the view of image consumers. It is this latter point I would like to discuss.

In September I was commissioned by a local magazine called Capital, to produce a portrait of stage actor, Matt Landreth, at the St James theatre. The story was to be a profile piece about an “interesting local doing interesting things”. An excerpt from the original commissioning email is below (click on the image to enlarge):

Shalee Email 1 copyI was given 15 minutes for the shoot, which included using locations on and around the stage, and using props and/or costumes which are part of the actors character. Only having 15 minutes to get the images, you generally have to work pretty fast to get a variety of different shots so the magazine has enough work to choose from when designing the layout for the magazine. This means shooting landscape and portrait formats, in full-body, half-body, head and shoulders, and environmental portraits in different locations around the theatre. Plus using both flash lit and ambient lighting to suit the magazines style. As you can imagine, 15 minutes is a challenging time-frame in which to get all these different shots.

Upon meeting Matt at the theatre, he suggests wearing the only costume piece he had available which was a set of bright red Devil’s horns. The issue at hand here becomes a creative one. Personally I like the horns. Below are some examples of the images I shot for the assignment:

Matt Landreth - St James Theatre Matt Landreth - St James Theatre  Matt Landreth - St James Theatre

The initial assignment brief (see above email excerpt)  explicitly suggests the use of the stage, auditorium and costumes being available for the portrait. Upon reviewing the images, the feedback I received from the art director was: “I’ve got your shots of Matt too, thanks v much. Just wondering if there’s any shots of Matt without those horns? The photos are perfect, it’s just the horns really shattering the shot”.

There was no further communication between myself or the magazine regarding this issue.

Everyone is entitled to their opinion, however the mention of an unspecific costume is alluded to in the email. Whether the horns “shatter” the image is an aesthetic opinion and has no relation to the technical quality of the images I produced.  If I had submitted technically flawed images (i.e. out of focus, blurred due to camera shake, poor colour balance, poor exposure), I could perhaps understand the response.

Having not liked the images I produced for this assignment due to a cosmetic element, the magazine decided not to publish the images for the article.  Below is a screen shot of how the article was eventually published in the October issue:

Matt Landreth Screen Shot copy

As you can see, the location and style of the image used differs widely from the original brief. Just to make it clear, this isn’t my photo.

When taking on a freelance assignment for a magazine, payment for the work is made either one or two weeks after the assignment deadline, or one month after publication of the images, depending on the size of the magazine or publisher. It took several emails to the art director and editor (from whom I never received a response) and several phone calls over a three-month period to get my payment of NZ$50 (yes it is a substandard rate by magazine standards but sometimes it is the principle that matters) for this assignment. When I finally received a phone call from the editor regarding my payment, it was mentioned that there was a “problem” with the images taken at the theatre. I was eventually paid in early December for this assignment. In my opinion, this behaviour suggests that the magazine decided to withhold my payment because they chose not to use the images for the publication.

This is very poor behaviour for a magazine which relies on freelance contributors for its content and features many creative individuals in its pages. This  kind of treatment shows how the photographic craft has been devalued by a saturated market, and it is exploitative of emerging creative professionals. Every other magazine would simply not employ a freelancer again if the aesthetic style didn’t quite match their taste. Every magazine assignment is  an organic and evolving working relationship, and sometimes a photographer’s personal style won’t always suit the clients requirements – and this is fine and completely acceptable.

I have been hesitant regarding publishing this post. I finally decided to publish it because I believe it is important for other photographers (and other creative freelancers) to understand their rights when producing work, to know the value of your work and experience, and the lesson to be learned is to be persistent when dealing with conflicts such as this. It’s our right to be paid for the work we have produced on assignment – promptly and without having to repeatedly ask for it.

I’m glad that all other magazines I have worked for so far have shown a much more professional attitude in terms of how they deal with freelance contributors. And I’m also happy to say they are all returning clients 🙂

I’d be interested to hear about other photographers experiences and how they deal with these unfortunate issues when they arise.


Sheet Music Archive – Unlimited Magazine

A couple of months ago I was given an assignment by Unlimited magazine to photograph David Dell. The Sheet Music Archive is located at the former site of the National Centre for Biosecurity and Disease Control (which has now move to the site next door) on Ward Street in Upper Hutt. The whole site has the appearance of an abandoned town, with numerous dirty, empty institutional-style buildings, desolate spaces with no human presence (except for myself and David Dell) and vegetation that is gradually asserting its dominance and creeping across and through unused tarmac.

The Sheet Music Archive itself is housed in a small, dark portacabin and is filled with boxes of, and random stacks of sheet music. Being run by volunteers, it might not be the most modern of archives but has its own chaotic charm, which to me suits the idea (at least visually) of an archive. Below are portraits of David Dell, who is the lead volunteer for the Sheet Music Archive.

David Dell - Sheet Music Archive David Dell - Sheet Music Archive David Dell - Sheet Music Archive David Dell - Sheet Music ArchiveDavid Dell - Sheet Music Archive David Dell - Sheet Music Archive David Dell - Sheet Music Archive David Dell - Sheet Music ArchiveUnlimited - David Dell - Sheet music archive


Fishhead Magazine Street Characters Feature

These images were shot a few months ago for an article on Wellington’s popular ‘street characters’.

Wellington Street Characters

Beat box king, King Homeboy on Cuba Street, Wellington. King Homeboy – roughly translated as “to donate mana” and “my area” – uses his beat-boxing skills to act as a voice of the people. Having been beat-boxing for 13 years, King Homeboy competed in the beat-boxing world championships to 2012 and funded his trip to Berlin by raising $5000 through social networks in twenty days.

Wellington Street Characters

Wellington Street Characters

Wellington Street Characters

The Political Busker, aka Benjamin Easton outside the Eagle Technology Building on Victoria Street, which houses the offices of the Ministry of Justice. Ben’s role as the Political Busker is to fight apathy and by challenging the institutions of the crown, he hopes to prove that it’s a vessel of injustice and hopefully provide a remedy.

Wellington Street Characters Wellington Street Characters

Wellington Street Characters

Edward Harcourt is a self-taught magician who started out performing magic tricks in Portland, Oregon in the US seven years ago. Doing something he loves, Edward works hard to cultivate himself as a street entertainer: “the real magic is the laughter” he says.

Wellington Street Characters

Wellington Street Characters

For a total of 43 years, this man (who did not wish to be named) has dedicated himself to spreading the word of God, and is a popular face on Wellington’s Lambton Quay.

Wellington Street Characters